About

Bio

Born: Sidney, Nebraska
Lives & works: Arden, Delaware
Educaton: Rhode Island School of Design, BFA Sculpture

Awards

2016 Delaware Division of the Arts-Individual Artist Fellow
Visual Arts: Works on Paper-established professional

Exhibitions

2017 Waddell Art Gallery, Northern Virginia Community College, "Reconfigurations", solo show, Sterling, VA
2016 Mezzanine Gallery, "Twenty Questions", solo show, Wilmington, DE
2016 Biggs Museum of American Art, "Award Winners XVI, Dover, DE
2016 Kai Lin Art, "The New South", Atlanta, GA
2015 Philadelphia Sculpture Gym Gallery, "Small Works IV", Philadelphia, PA
2015 Greenpoint Gallery, group show, Brooklyn, NY
2015 Washington Printmakers Gallery, "Ar-ti-facts", solo show, Washington, DC
2014 Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, "35-Year History" , Wilmington DE
2014 Pyramid Atlantic Art Center, "Outside the Margin" Silver Spring, MD
2014 New Wilmington Art Association, group show, Wilmington, DE
2013 The Museum of Printing History, group show, Houston, TX
2013 Washington Printmakers Gallery, "Extractions" solo show, Silver Spring, MD
2012 Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, "Directions", Annapolis, MD
2012 Washington Printmakers Gallery, "Blurring the Lines", Silver Spring, MD
2002 Woods Gerry Gallery, "First Triennial Sculpture Exhibition", Providence, RI
1985 Caldbeck Gallery, "Decoys for Abstract Hunters", Rockland, ME
1984 Caldbeck Gallery, "Group Drawing Show", Rockland, ME
1984 Farnsworth Museum, "Juried All Maine", Rockland, ME
1983 Unversity of Maine, solo show-"Wall Constructions", Augusta, ME
1981 University of Southern Maine, "All-Maine Biennial", Gorham, ME

Publications

2015 Jenkins, Bill, “Spring Solos as presented by seven artists”,
The Washington Post, June 21, 2015, Arts&Style section Sunday ed. print

2013 Jenkins, Bill. “Ron Meick’s Extraktions’ puts meaning into fragment”,
The Washington Post, June 14, 2013 Sunday ed. print.

Statement

In a world economy, cultural changes are communicated quickly and can be originated anywhere on the globe. They can also move slowly and almost undetected to emerge as obvious. Both can be personally relevant. I believe in a pluralistic and inclusive process of object making. My work contains residue from the visual environment such as world events, archeological, political, economic, scientific and social developments. Image content can be generated in many different forms and do not exclude any means to achieve a meaningful and communicative image that provokes.

Evidence of one’s own presence are the marks or residue that is left behind. These marks are many times transient, deliberate, anonymous, personal,temporary, or convey a decision making process. Marks using color, shape, direction, size, and other cues to make relationships resulting in a metaphoric visual structure.

I have been using printmaking as a means for mark making because it has both an immediate and gradual means of developing image content. The print as a metaphor for leaving evidence results in correlation with the process and final object. Making marks is immediate during the activity but printing produces just the evidence of the original action. This once removed image gives a quality to the object that implies reproduction but is also of the moment. Application of color has been central to enhancing these marks and adding an additional layer of structural/emotive meaning.

Process

My current work utilizes many different ways to make multiple and one of a kind prints.

-Monotypes are printed from multi shaped Plexiglas plates with etching ink. A reductive process is used making marks in the ink results in white or gray areas.that are colored with transparent and opaque watercolors.
-Drypoint in which shaped Lexan plates are scratched with a metal point and then inked.
-Lithography used on multi shaped stones that have been drawn on with greasy pencils and inks.
-Woodcuts are carved, inked and printed with or without a press.
-Printing on paper that has been folded ,then printed, and allowed to dry in various shapes.
-An ongoing series of small format monotypes are crumpled after printing which compresses the paper and image into unpredictable objects.
-Using the matrix(plate or object used for printing) as part of the final work.

Sculptural projects are generally fabricated from commonly found materials which use many metalworking and woodworking methods.